Suzanne Fuqua, PhD
Disclosures: Nothing to disclose - 04/14/2022
OMB No. 0925-0046, Biographical Sketch Format Page

OMB No. 0925-0001 and 0925-0002 (Rev. 12/2020 Approved Through 02/28/2023)


BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH

Provide the following information for the Senior/key personnel and other significant contributors.


Follow this format for each person. DO NOT EXCEED FIVE PAGES.

NAME: Suzanne A.W. Fuqua


eRA COMMONS USER NAME (credential, e.g., agency login): SFUQUA


POSITION TITLE: Professor


EDUCATION/TRAINING (Begin with baccalaureate or other initial professional education, such as nursing, include postdoctoral training and residency training if applicable. Add/delete rows as necessary.)

 

 

INSTITUTION AND LOCATION

DEGREE

(if     applicable)

Completion Date MM/YYYY

 

FIELD OF STUDY

University of Houston, Houston, TX

B.Sc.

01/1976

Biology

University of Houston, Houston, TX

M.Sc.

01/1978

Microbiology

University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Science

Ph.D.

01/1982

Cancer Biology

A.     Personal Statement

Dr. Fuqua is an internationally recognized leader in the field of estrogen receptor (ESR1) mutations and mechanisms of endocrine therapy resistance in breast cancer. She is the original discoverer of clinically relevant ESR1 mutations imparting therapeutic resistance in breast cancer. She has co-authored more than 200 publications; all of these publications pertain to translational breast cancer research and are thus relevant to this application. The main goal of her research is to determine the role of specific somatic mutations in estrogen receptor α, called K303R, Y537S/N/C, and D538G ESR1, in the clinical problem of hormone resistance and metastasis. A major goal of her laboratory is to develop novel therapeutics to target these alterations in ESR1 to restore hormone sensitivity, as well as to identify other novel mechanisms of resistance that co-occur with and influence the outcome of patients. Current models of resistance understudy include androgen receptor (AR), estrogen-binding protein (Ebp50), IGF1R, and RON. In addition to her research activities, Dr. Fuqua is actively involved in cancer research education and career enhancement. She is Associate Director of Cancer Research Education and Training Coordination at the Dan L Duncan Comprehensive Cancer Center Cancer. In this capacity, she facilitates cancer education and career enhancement at all levels, including undergraduate, graduate, and junior faculty.

Selected publications most relevant to grant submission include:

1.) Gu G, Tian L, Herzog SK, Rechoum Y, Gelsomino L, Gao M, Du L, Kim JA, Dustin D, Lo HC, Beyer AR, Edwards DG, Gonzalez T, Tsimelzon A, Huang HJ, Fernandez NM, Grimm SL, Hilsenbeck SG, Liu D, Xu J, Alaniz A, Li S, Mills GB, Janku F, Kittler R, Zhang XH, Coarfa C, Foulds CE, Symmans WF, Andò S, Fuqua SAW. Hormonal modulation of ESR1 mutant metastasis. Oncogene. 2020 Dec 15. PMID: 33323970.

2.) Dustin D, Gu G, Beyer AR, Herzog SK, Edwards DG, Lin H, Gonzalez TL, Grimm SL, Coarfa C, Chan DW, Kim BJ, De La O JP, Ellis MJ, Liu D, Li S, Welm AL, Fuqua SAW. RON signalling promotes therapeutic resistance in ESR1 mutant breast cancer. Br J Cancer. 2021 Jan;124(1):191-206. PMID: 33257837.

3.) Herzog, SK and Fuqua, SAW. ESR1 mutations and therapeutic resistance in metastatic breast cancer: progress and remaining challenges. British J Can, Br J Cancer. 2021 Oct 7. Online ahead of print.  PMID: 34621045.

 

Selected Ongoing Research Support:

R01CA072038 (Fuqua)                                                                                                  09/1996 – 12/2026

NIH/NCI

Replication Stress and DNA Damage Response Drives ESR1 Mutant Metastasis

 

BCRF-21-055 (Fuqua)                                                                                                  10/2014 – 09/2022

Breast Cancer Research Foundation

Role of ESR1 mutations in breast cancer progression

 

R01CA207270 (Fuqua)                                                                                                  03/2017 – 02/2023 NCE

NIH/NCI

Mechanisms of AR-ER Collaboration In Hormone Resistance and Metastasis of Breast Cancer

 

T32CA203690 (Fuqua/Ellis)                                                                                                  09/2018 – 08/2023

NIH/NCI

Translational Breast Cancer Research Training Program

 

P50CA186784 (Ellis)                                                                                                  08/2020 – 07/2025

NIH/NCI

Translational Research in Breast Cancer

 

RP180712 (Hunt)                                                                                                                09/2018 – 08/2023

CPRIT- MIRA

Rational Combination Treatment Options to Reverse Resistance in Hormone Receptor Positive Breast Cancer Refractory to Standard Therapy

 

P30CA125123 (Heslop)                                                                                    07/2020 – 06/2025

NIH/NCI

Baylor College of Medicine Cancer Center

 

B.     Positions and Honors Positions and Employment

2013-present

Associate Director of Cancer Research, Training and Education Coordination, Dan L. Duncan Comprehensive

Cancer Center, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas

2011-present

Leader, Nuclear Receptor, Transcription and Chromatin Biology Program, Dan L. Duncan Comprehensive Cancer Center, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas

2007-2008

Distinguished Alumna and Professor, University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Houston, Texas

1999-present

Professor (tenured), Breast Center, Depts. Medicine, and Molecular and Cellular Biology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas

1999-present

Director of the Translational Breast Cancer Research Training Program, Breast Center, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas

1994-1999

Associate Professor (tenured), Department of Medicine/Medical Oncology, University of

Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, Texas

1990-1994

Assistant Professor, Department of Medicine/Medical Oncology, University of Texas

Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas

1987-1990

Research Instructor, Department of Medicine/Medical Oncology, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas

1985-1986

Postdoctoral Fellow, Department of Medicine/Medical Oncology, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas

1983-1985

Senior Research Associate, Virology and Immunology Department, Southwest

Foundation for Biomedical Research, San Antonio, Texas

1982-1983

Project Investigator, Department of Tumor Virology, The University of Texas System

Cancer Center, M.D. Anderson Hospital and Tumor Institute, Houston, Texas

Other Experience and Professional Memberships (selected)

 

2017-2022

NIH Basic Mechanisms of Cancer Therapeutics (MCT1) Study Section, permanent

member

2017

NIH Special Emphasis Panel/Scientific Review Group, U54 Mechanisms of Cancer

Resistance and Sensitivity, Member

2016

Department of Defense Congressionally Directed Medical Research Program, Breast Cancer Research Program, Era of Hope Scholar Study Section, Chair

2015

18th European Cancer Congress, Scientific Symposium Session Chair

2015

Department of Defense Congressionally Directed Medical Research Program, Breast Cancer Research Program, Cancer Biology Study Section, Chair

2014

San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium, Career Development Forum, Chair

2009-2012

American Cancer Society, Council for Extramural Grants, member

2007-2008

Women in Cancer Research, Leila Diamond Networking Breakfast Committee, Chair

2005-2008

Women in Cancer Research Council, American Assoc. Cancer Research, member

2004-2007

Breast Cancer Research Program of California, Tumor Progression Study Section, Chair

1987-2014

San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium, Abstract Selection Committee member

1979-1982

Rosalie B Hite Predoctoral Fellowship Award, MD Anderson Cancer Center

 

C.     Contributions to Science

1.        Role of estrogen receptor gene (ESR1) splice variants and somatic mutations in breast cancer progression and clinical hormone resistance. Dr. Fuqua was the first to clone alternatively-spliced ESR1 transcriptional variants and somatic ESR1 mutations from premalignant and breast cancer samples. Her laboratory determined that these mutations alter many aspects of hormone action, including binding to co- regulatory proteins, enhanced stability, estrogen hypersensitivity, response to tamoxifen, and resistance to aromatase inhibitors. The major goal of her laboratory is to develop novel therapeutics to target these ESR1 mutations to restore hormone sensitivity in patients harboring these mutations.

a)      Zhang, Q-X., Borg, A., Wolf, D. M., Oesterreich, S., and Fuqua, SAW.: An estrogen receptor mutant with strong hormone-independent activity from a metastatic breast cancer. Cancer Research, 57:1244-1249, 1997. PMID: 9102207.

b)      Fuqua SAW, Wiltschke, C., Zhang, Q. X., Borg, Å., Castles, C. G., Friedrichs, W. E., Hopp, T. A., Hilsenbeck, S. G., Mohsin, S., O'Connell, P., and Allred, D. C.: A hypersensitive estrogen receptor α mutation in premalignant breast hyperplasias. Cancer Research, 60:4026-4029, 2000. PMID: 19842032

c)      Gelsomino L, Gu G, Rechoum Y, Beyer AR, Pejerrey SM, Tsimelzon A, Want T, Huffman K, Luslow A, Ando S, Fuqua, SAW: ESR1 mutations affect anti-proliferative responses to tamoxifen through enhanced cross-talk with IGF signaling. Breast Cancer Res Treat., 2016, 157(2):253-265. PMID: 27178332.

d)      Gu G, Tian L, Herzog SK, Rechoum Y, Gelsomino L, Gao M, Du L, Kim JA, Dustin D, Lo HC, Beyer AR, Edwards DG, Gonzalez T, Tsimelzon A, Huang HJ, Fernandez NM, Grimm SL, Hilsenbeck SG, Liu D, Xu J, Alaniz A, Li S, Mills GB, Janku F, Kittler R, Zhang XH, Coarfa C, Foulds CE, Symmans WF, Andò S, Fuqua SAW. Hormonal modulation of ESR1 mutant metastasis. Oncogene. 2020 Dec 15. PMID: 33323970.

2.  Novel mechanisms of hormone resistance. Using expression profiling of metastatic breast tumor samples Dr. Fuqua’s laboratory identified a number of unique mechanisms of hormone resistance that impact on ESR1 phosphorylation, and response to tamoxifen and aromatase inhibitors in breast cancer. She also discovered that several of these resistance markers conferred metastatic capabilities to ER-positive cells in vivo. Current resistance genes understudy include Rho GDIα, androgen receptor (AR), Dicer1, and metastasis associated protein (MTA2).

a)      Cui, Y., Zhang, M., Pestell, R., and Fuqua, SAW: Phosphorylation of estrogen receptor blocks its acetylation and regulates estrogen sensitivity. Cancer Research, 64:9199-9208, 2004. PMID: 15604923

b)      Barone I, Brusco L, Gu G, Selever J, Beyer A, Covington KR, Tsimelzon A, Wang T, Hilsenbeck SG, Chamness GC, Andò S, Fuqua SA. Loss of Rho GDIα and resistance to tamoxifen via effects on ERα J Natl Cancer Inst. 2011; 103(7):538-52. PMID: 21447808. PMCID: PMC3071355.

c)      Rechoum Y, Rovito D, Iacopetta D, Barone I, Ando S, Weigel NL, O’Malley BW, Brown PH, and Fuqua SA. Androgen receptor collaborates with ERα in aromatase inhibitor-resistant breast cancer. Breast Cancer Res Treat., 147:473-485, 2014. PMID: 25178514. PMCID: PMC4337991.

d)      Dustin D, Gu G, Beyer AR, Herzog SK, Edwards DG, Lin H, Gonzalez TL, Grimm SL, Coarfa C, Chan DW, Kim BJ, De La O JP, Ellis MJ, Liu D, Li S, Welm AL, Fuqua SAW. RON signalling promotes therapeutic resistance in ESR1 mutant breast cancer. Br J Cancer. 2021 Jan;124(1):191-206. PMID: 33257837.

3.   Integration of prognostic and predictive markers of breast cancer outcomes. Dr. Fuqua has a long- standing interest in elucidating clinically useful markers of breast cancer progression and has contributed by conducting pivotal studies on the p53 tumor suppressor protein, heat shock proteins 27 and 70, progesterone receptor (PR), and ER β which identify patients with a worse overall survival and time to progression.

a)      Hopp, T. A, Weiss, H. L., Hilsenbeck, S. G., Allred, D. C., Horwitz, K. B., and Fuqua, S. A. W.: Breast Cancer Patients with Progesterone Receptor A-Rich Tumors Have Poorer Disease-Free Survival Rates,

Clinical Cancer Research 10:2751-2760, 2004. PMID: 15102680

b)      Hopp, T. A., Weiss, H. L., Parra, I., Cui, Y., Osborne, C. K., and Fuqua, SAW.: Low levels of estrogen receptor β protein predict resistance to tamoxifen therapy in breast cancer. Clinical Cancer Research, 10:7490-7499, 2004. PMID: 15102680.

c)      Burstein, M.D., Tsimelzon, A., Poage, G.M., Covington, K.R., Contreras, A., Fuqua, S.A., Savage, M.Il, Osborne, C.K., Hilsenbeck, S.G., Change, J.C., Mills, G.B., Lau, C.C., and Brown, P.H. Comprehensive genomic analysis identifies novel subtypes and targets of triple-negative breast cancer. Clin Cancer Res. 21:1688-98, 2015. PMID: 25208897. PMCID: PMC4362882.

d)      Veeraraghavan J, De Angelis C, Mao R, Wang T, Herrera S, Pavlick AC, Contreras A, Nuciforo P, Mayer IA, Forero A, Nanda R, Goetz MP, Chang JC, Wolff AC, Krop IE, Fuqua SAW, Prat A, Hilsenbeck SG, Weigelt B, Reis-Filho JS, Gutierrez C, Osborne CK, Rimawi MF, Schiff R. A combinatorial biomarker predicts pathologic complete response to neoadjuvant lapatinib and trastuzumab without chemotherapy in patients with HER2+ breast cancer. Ann Oncol. 2019 Mar 23. PMID:30903140

 

Complete List of Published Work: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/myncbi/suzanne.fuqua.1/bibliography/40630692/public/?sort=date&direction= ascending

 

Total publications: >200; Total citations: 24,829, h-index: 80